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ASP volunteers constructed this ramp and pathway for an Avery County resident in summer
2012.
Submitted photo



Originally published: 2013-05-03 15:19:42
Last modified: 2013-05-03 15:34:58

Summer volunteers to repair homes in Watauga, Avery

by Anna Oakes

Watauga and Avery county families in need of home repairs may apply now for free services from the Appalachia Service Project, which will bring volunteers to the area this summer.


The nonprofit Christian home repair ministry will spend six weeks in Watauga County and seven weeks in Avery County this summer. Using volunteer teams of two adults and five youths, ASP provides free repairs for low-income clients selected through the application process.


"The more applications we have, the more opportunity we have to go out in the county and find the people who need us the most," said Megan Armstrong, ASP program manager.


ASP, in partnership with Boone-based WAMY Community Action, will coordinate repairs on foundations, floors, porches, plumbing, wheelchair ramps, electrical systems, doors, windows and roofs. Weatherization and other projects will be included.


Armstrong said she expects that between 15 and 20 projects will be completed in each county this summer.


WAMY worked with Watauga County Schools to arrange for ASP volunteer teams to be headquartered at Green Valley School.


"(WAMY has) been instrumental in our expansion in North Carolina," Armstrong said.


Applications are available through WAMY; call (828) 264-2421 or (828) 773-0156 for more information. Applications can also be downloaded and submitted at http://www.asphome.org.


Interested residents are asked to apply by May 29, especially for consideration of more time-consuming projects, but Armstrong said applications will be accepted throughout the ASP teams' visits to the area.


Since its founding in 1969, ASP has repaired more than 13,000 homes throughout Central Appalachian Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia and North Carolina through the work of more than 250,000 volunteers from across the nation.